Oriental

Chinoiseries, put an Asian touch in your decoration

If the other day I talked about the wonderful decorations of the Moroccan riad, today I woke up with a point of chinoiseries. I refer to an artistic style that has devastated Europe at different times and reflects the influence of China and is characterized by use of own designs from China, asymmetry, capricious changes in size, the use of lacquered materials and abundant decoration.

The chinoiserie It entered Europe approximately in the last quarter of the 17th century and its boom occurred in the mid-18th century, when it was assimilated by the rococo. Later it fell into disuse, being recovered in the 20s of the last century. Well, personally, it's fusion vintage Y chinoiserie, I love.

The colonies in India and China of the great powers such as Holland and England bring exotic objects to Europe, which were immediately copied by the craftsmen of the time. The ceramics made in Delft and Meissen adopt the White and blue Ming Dynasty art decoration At the beginning of the century, they also imitated the Chinese forms of plates, glasses and tea sets.

But in China imagined by artisans, mandarins lived in precious mountainous landscapes with cobweb bridges, they wore flowered umbrellas and lived in subtle bamboo buildings stalked by dragons and phoenix while in the surroundings the monkeys swayed in their trees, which has been a "chinese tale".

He tang (era of the greatest splendor of Chinese civilization) evolved into a Georgian table and square-backed armchairs so appreciated by English gentlemen and all the large mansions have their guest room or lounge chinoiserie, with a Chinese style bed, the wallpaper walls with themes of phoenix and dragons and Chinese porcelain.

Well, a whole room would not decorate style chinoiserie, but small details yes. For example, a nice black lacquered wardrobe, a secretair with simple scene, a small cabinet to store papers or even lacquered dining chairs, with their bamboo backs crossed. The famous toy makers, full of tiny carved bridges, sliding doors and "secrets" to keep fabulous jewels, are more difficult to put, although a totally bare wall could be an option.

And if we talked about separating environments with wrought iron doors, the beautiful lattices With geometric patterns or bamboo screens are also a solution to give a Chinese touch to your home. The other screens, more overloaded with lacquer with painted flowers or even embedded ivory With exotic Chinese scenes, they are already more complicated to combine with modern furniture, although everything is to try and risk.

Do you like the idea of ​​putting a note chinoiserie in your decoration?

Popular Posts

Category Oriental, Next Article

Show us your house: Margot's living room
Living room

Show us your house: Margot's living room

Our dear reader Margot has sent us some photos of her living room, so that we can see how with simplicity and details you can get a decoration that reflects our personality. He also showed us his bathroom and his original bedroom. Margot's hall is characterized by the choice of white as the predominant color, which brings luminosity and vitality.
Read More
Before and after: a sofa with lots of color
Living room

Before and after: a sofa with lots of color

Surely some of you have ever been tempted to take a piece of furniture from the garbage container to restore it, I have never gotten to do it, but on occasion I have been ready, sometimes it happens that when you go to throw the garbage you find some chair, armchair or armchair that, while being damaged, looks like they could look great after varnishing, painting or upholstering.
Read More
Jack in the box, shelves that come down with crank
Living room

Jack in the box, shelves that come down with crank

The truth is that the usefulness of the idea of ​​lowering the shelves with a crank is rather non-existent, but the furniture has a nice name Jack in de box and that of turning the crank to lower and raise the shelf, can serve as an excuse to do some exercise and also has its grace.
Read More